It’s a small world after all

Recently I saw a meme floating around that just about made me cry. I won’t post it here, but suffice it to say there are some people in the world who can’t keep condiments and continents straight.

Folks, this just should not be.

After I got my shoulders down from around my ears and managed to unclench my jaw, I grabbed the nearest child– who happened to be 3 year-old Birdie– and demanded, “Name the continents.” After dutifully recounting “Norf America, Souf America, U-rop, Asia, and Ausssstrail-yuh! Africa! Ant-arc-tick-uh! These are the continents!” in her delightful sing-song voice, she then gave me the run down of the oceans. I then dragged her sweet little self over to our massive wall map and had her sing the song again, this time pointing to the appropriate land masses.

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On Being Homeschooled {Reminisces of a Soon-To-Be Grad}

A good while back, my mother wrote a post about homeschooling high school. And of course, as promised, it’s quite a while later that I’m sitting here at the keyboard to address many of the questions that a teenage homeschooler gets asked at any and all social gatherings. We freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, and free floaters of the homeschooling community seem to be black sheep, the smallest minority of the entire category. Oftentimes, it’s assumed that because you made it through the entire run of education at your kitchen table, you either must have hated every moment of it or had the most iron-nerved parents around. I’m here to say that that’s not always the case. There are actually homeschooled high schoolers who have made it and enjoyed it. Correction. LOVED IT.

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{Work in Progress Wednesday}

“It’s spring fever. That is what the name of it is. And when you’ve got it, you want—oh, you don’t quite know what it is you do want, but it just fairly makes your heart ache, you want it so!”
–Mark Twain

(Work in progress: settling six chicks into their new, temporary home in our schoolroom.
Marvelous odes of gratitude to our friends, the As, for allowing us to raise their next batch of hens as a learning experience.)

We’d love to see your works in progress. Something that makes you feel simple, full, or creative. Something you’re making. Something you’re doing (folding a pile of laundry–again?). Something you’re planning. Share in the comments!

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{Mites and Missions} I don’t support a missionary because …

 And He sat down opposite the treasury, and began observing how the people were putting money into the treasury; and many rich people were putting in large sums.  A poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which amount to a cent.  Calling His disciples to Him, He said to them, “Truly I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the contributors to the treasury;  for they all put in out of their surplus, but she, out of her poverty, put in all she owned, all she had to live on.”
Mark 12:41-44

When you open up and present yourself to fellow believers as a missionary, one of those crazy “going to live somewhere without a Starbucks” kind of Christian, the dialogue changes. It’s a natural, organic transition. Here I am, standing in the lobby of your church beside a Nepali flag and a computer running a continuous loop of robed men turning prayer wheels and children setting bits of food in front of golden idols. The first obvious topic of conversation is not what my camping plans are for the summer or whether or not I prefer Coke or Pepsi. It’s all about the mission field. And that’s fine.

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Feeding the People {a large family’s 2 week menu, with recipe links}

It’s pseudo-spring here in western Washington– warm and clear one day, cool and overcast the next. The only thing you can count on this time of year is frogs singing, lots of mud, and rain in all its glorious forms. From downpour to drizzle, we do it all in Washington. I know that sounds depressing to some of you, but others (and you know who you are) are more than happy to join me in appreciating the sunshine and the puddles.

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Roots and Wings

The best and worst part of parenting is watching your kids grow up. Watching them shed the skin of babyhood and take to their own two feet, seeing toddlerhood  slide into the elementary years, witnessing the transition from kid to teen. It’s beautiful and awful, I tell you. And it’s inveitable.

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{Work in Progress Wednesdays}

“Some people like to paint pictures, or do gardening, or build a boat in the basement. Other people get a tremendous pleasure out of the kitchen, because cooking is just as creative and imaginative an activity as drawing, or wood carving, or music.”
–Julia Child

(Work in progress: tinkering in the kitchen, one of my favorite things to do.)

We’d love to see your works in progress. Something that makes you feel simple, full, or creative. Something you’re making. Something you’re doing (folding a pile of laundry–again?). Something you’re planning. Share in the comments!

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